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Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

5 edition of The Etiology of bulimia nervosa found in the catalog.

The Etiology of bulimia nervosa

the individual and familial context

  • 184 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Hemisphere Pub. Corp. in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Bulimia -- Etiology -- Congresses.,
  • Bulimia -- etiology -- congresses.,
  • Bulimia -- genetics -- congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by Janis H. Crowther ... [et al.].
    SeriesSeries in applied psychology, Series in applied psychology (New York, N.Y.)
    ContributionsCrowther, Janis H., Kent State University. Applied Psychology Center., Kent Psychology Forum (2nd : 1990 : Kent State University)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC552.B84 E84 1992
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxv, 252 p. :
    Number of Pages252
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1555154M
    ISBN 101560322063
    LC Control Number91035329

    This guideline is concerned with the identification, treatment and management of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa as defined in the 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD 10) (WHO, ). The guideline does not address the management of loss of appetite, psychogenic disturbance of appetite or other conditions that involve significant weight loss but which are due. Biological factors associated with bulimia nervosa Bulimia can be ingrained in your brain or genes; meaning that developing this disorder is not your fault. Genes are heritable traits that we pass down to our offspring and include hair color, eye color, personality traits and an increased prevalence for developing medical and mental health disorders.

    Bulimia Nervosa. Bulimia nervosa repeats a frequent cycle that involves eating unusually large amounts of food, followed by purging (self-induced vomiting), fasting, laxative abuse, excessive exercise, and/or other compensatory behaviors. Over time, the physically damaging effects of bulimia mirror its intense emotional toll.   Bulimia nervosa combines two seriously unhealthy eating behaviors: bingeing and purging. During a bingeing episode, people eat large amounts .

    Bulimia nervosa, also known as simply bulimia, is an eating disorder characterized by binge eating followed by purging. Binge eating refers to eating a large amount of food in a short amount of time. Purging refers to the attempts to get rid of the food consumed. This may be done by vomiting or taking laxatives. Other efforts to lose weight may include the use of diuretics, stimulants, water Causes: Genetic and environmental factors. Bulimia Nervosa-This eating disorder is characterized by repeated binge eating followed by behaviors that compensate for the overeating, such as forced vomiting, excessive exercise, or extreme use of laxatives or diuretics. Men and women who suffer from Bulimia may fear weight gain and feel severely unhappy with their body size and shape.


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The Etiology of bulimia nervosa Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Etiology Of Bulimia Nervosa book The Individual And Familial Context: Material Arising From The Second Annual Kent Psychology Forum, Kent, October Edited By Janis H.

Crowther, Stevan E. Hobfoll, Mary A. Stephens, Daniel L. TennenbaumBook Edition: 1st Edition. The Etiology Of Bulimia Nervosa book The Individual And Familial Context: Material Arising From The Second Annual Kent Psychology Forum, Kent, October Edited By Janis H. Crowther, Stevan E.

Hobfoll, Mary A. Stephens, Daniel L. TennenbaumCited by: The Etiology Of Bulimia Nervosa: The Individual And Familial Context: Material Arising From The Second Annual Kent Psychology Forum, Kent, October (Series in Applied Psychology) 1st Edition by Janis H. Crowther (Editor), Stevan E.

Hobfoll (Editor), Mary A. Stephens (Editor), Daniel L. Tennenbaum (Editor) & 1 more4/5(1). The Etiology Of Bulimia Nervosa: The Individual And Familial Context: Material Arising From The Second Annual Kent Psychology Forum, Kent, October and Physical Processes in Mechanics) - Kindle edition by Crowther, Janis H., Hobfoll, Stevan E., Stephens, Mary A., Tennenbaum, Daniel L.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.4/5(1). Among the cardinal features of bulimia nervosa are cyclical episodes of bingeing and purging (the latter including self-induced vomiting), laxatives, diuretics, and strict dieting or fasting to counteract the weight gain associated with excessive caloric by: 3.

Prevention of bulimia nervosa: questions and challenges / Ruth H. Striegel-Moore; Etiology of bulimia nervosa: conceptual, research, and measurement issues / Janis H.

Crowther and J. Scott Mizes. Description xv, p.: ill. ; 24 cm. Notes. Based on the Kent Psychology Forum sponsored by the Applied Psychology Center The Etiology of bulimia nervosa book Kent State.

The Etiology of Anorexia Nervosa Since the recognition of anorexia nervosa as a psychological disorder, the medically accepted definition of the disorder has changed.

The currently accepted DSM-IV definition of a full syndrome anorexic patient will display all of the following symptoms File Size: KB.

Who has bulimia nervosa. It is very difficult to find accurate statistics about bulimia nervosa as it so often goes undiagnosed and untreated.

What we do know is that it affects very large numbers of people. Studies put the figure at around % of adult women in the UK- although actual numbers are likely to be higher than Size: KB.

Bulimia nervosa, characterized b binge-eating, self-induced vomiting, laxative abuse, or fasting, is a major health concern that affects 1 to 3 % of college-age women in the United States.

A uniquely modern disorder, bulimia occurs in industrialized societies that have. Offers a model of the aetiology of bulimia and for implementing treatment. This work describes how, for example, a family history of affective disorders, disturbances in the mother-child relationship Read more.

Bulimia, a term derived from Greek words meaning “ox” and “hunger,” is a food obsession characterized by repeated overeating binges followed by purges of forced vomiting, prolonged fasting, or abuse of laxatives, enemas, diuretics and amphetamines.

It provides temporary relief to emotional pain. If untreated, bulimia causes serious medical and dental by: 3. Read "The Etiology Of Bulimia Nervosa The Individual And Familial Context: Material Arising From The Second Annual Kent Psychology Forum, Kent, October " by available from Rakuten Kobo.

First published in Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa : Taylor And Francis. Bulimia Nervosa Epidemiology and Etiology Viewed: Epidemiology Between 1% and 3% of young adult females in the United States meet the diagnostic criteria for bulimia nervosa.

As many as 40% of young adults engage in episodic binge eating but do not meet the diagnostic criteria. Bulimia nervosa occurs in % of adolescent boys.

More thanpeople in the UK are affected by an eating disorder. 1 Bulimia nervosa is a type of eating disorder that affects % of people.

2 Bulimia is a serious eating disorder where someone might feel that they have lost control over their eating and evaluate themselves according to their body shape and weight. Someone with bulimia may feel caught in a cycle of eating large.

Unlike those with anorexia, people with bulimia can maintain a normal weight for their age. But like people with anorexia, they often fear gaining weight, want desperately to lose weight, and are. There are two common types of bulimia nervosa, which are as follows: Purging type – This type accounts for the majority of cases of those suffering from this eating disorder.

In this form, individuals will regularly engage in self-induced vomiting or abuse of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas after a period of bingeing. Bulimia nervosa typically begins during adolescence, and while it most often occurs in women, it also affects men.

Individuals with the disorder usually feel out of control while binging and purging. Afterwards they experience intense feelings of shame and guilt. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Johnson, Craig, Etiology and treatment of bulimia nervosa.

New York: Basic Books, © (OCoLC) Get this from a library. The Etiology of bulimia nervosa: the individual and familial context. [Janis H Crowther; Kent State University. Applied Psychology Center.;].

Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder in which a person binge eats followed by some type of behavior intended to prevent weight gain from the calories consumed. The disorder, first described in modern medical literature in by British psychiatrist Gerald Russell, seriously affects mental and physical health.

Introduction. Beliefs about the etiology of anorexia nervosa (AN) have undergone remarkable change. For decades, AN was considered to be a culture-bound disorder in which family and sociocultural factors were thought to play a major role, but research suggests that genetic factors are relevant in the vulnerability to this disorder ().AN is a complex disorder resulting from a combination of Cited by: The chapters successfully integrate theory and research on the etiology of the eating disorders.

The title of the book suggests that its focus is exclusively on bulimia nervosa. In reality, the focus is much broader, including research and theory pertaining to anorexia nervosa, subclinical eating disorders, and normal eating and dieting : Donald A.

Williamson.COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.